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Racial discrepancies in the association between paternal vs. maternal educational level and risk of low birthweight in Washington State

Authors
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Medicine

Abstract

1471-2393-4-10.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth Open AcceResearch article Racial discrepancies in the association between paternal vs. maternal educational level and risk of low birthweight in Washington State Christina Nicolaidis*1,2, Cynthia W Ko3, Somnath Saha1,2,4 and Thomas D Koepsell5 Address: 1Department of Medicine, Oregon Health And Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, 2Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health And Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, 3Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA, 4Section of General Internal Medicine, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA and 5Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA Email: Christina Nicolaidis* - [email protected]; Cynthia W Ko - [email protected]; Somnath Saha - [email protected]; Thomas D Koepsell - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: The role of paternal factors in determining the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes has received less attention than maternal factors. Similarly, the interaction between the effects of race and socioeconomic status (SES) on pregnancy outcomes is not well known. Our objective was to assess the relative importance of paternal vs. maternal education in relation to risk of low birth weight (LBW) across different racial groups. Methods: We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using Washington state birth certificate data from 1992 to 1996 (n = 264,789). We assessed the associations between maternal or paternal education and LBW, adjusting for demographic variables, health services factors, and maternal behavioral and obstetrical factors. Results: Paternal educational level was independently associated with LBW after adjustment for race, maternal education, demographic characteristics, health services factors; and other maternal factors. We found an interaction between the race

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