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‘A Man’s Story Is His Gris-Gris’ : Cultural Slavery, Literary Emancipation and Ishmael Reed’s Flight to Canada

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  • Design
  • Philosophy

Abstract

"A Man's Story Is His Gris-Gris": Cultural Slavery, Literary Emancipation and Ishmael Reed's "Flight to Canada" "A Man's Story Is His Gris-Gris": Cultural Slavery, Literary Emancipation and Ishmael Reed's "Flight to Canada" Author(s): Richard Walsh Reviewed work(s): Source: Journal of American Studies, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Apr., 1993), pp. 57-71 Published by: Cambridge University Press on behalf of the British Association for American Studies Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40464077 . Accessed: 31/10/2012 11:48 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] . Cambridge University Press and British Association for American Studies are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal of American Studies. http://www.jstor.org "A Man's Story is His Gris- Gris": Cultural Slavery, Literary Emancipation and Ishmael Reed's V light to Canada RICHARD WALSH With the emergence of black nationalism in the late sixties, the delineation of a new black aesthetic became an urgent issue : it was first and most persistently raised by Hoyt Fuller in Negro Digest, and soon became the staple of radical black little magazines across America. In 1971, the appearance of a collection of essays entitled The Black Aesthetic and edited by Addison Gayle brought some coherence to the debate, and sanctified its assumptions.1 In his own contributions to that book, Gayle recorded the passing of the myth of the American melting pot and the consequent need to repudiate assimilationism. He argued that black nationalis

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