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The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in congestive failure in conscious dogs.

Publication Date
  • Research Article
  • Biology
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacology


The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the development of congestive failure has been assessed in the conscious dog by use of the nonapeptide converting enzyme inhibitor. Constriction of the pulmonary artery or thoracic inferior vena cava was maintained for 2 wk while daily measurements were made of plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, plasma volume, hematocrit, serum sodium and potassium concentrations, sodium and water balance, body weight, and arterial, caval, and atrial pressures. The initial response to constriction was a reduction in blood pressure, a rise in plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, and water intake, and nearly complete sodium retention. In the days after moderate constriction plasma volume and body weight increased (with development of ascites and edema); blood pressure, sodium excretion, plasma renin acvitity, and plasma aldosterone returned to normal. In animals in which blood pressure was not restored, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone remained elevated throughout the period of constriction. Single injections of converting enzyme inhibitor reduced blood pressure when plasma renin activity was elevated. Chronic infusion of the inhibitor in dogs with thoracic inferior vena caval constriction prevented the restoration of blood pressure and suppressed the rise in plasma aldosterone; sodium retention and volume expansion were less than in control experiments. Thus the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays an essential role in the maintenance of blood pressure during the genesis of congestive failure. Initially, the restoration of blood pressure is dependent upon circulating angiotensin II; in the later stages, blood pressure is dependent upon the increase in plasma volume.

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