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Genome-scale analysis of positional clustering of mouse testis-specific genes

Authors
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science

Abstract

1471-2164-6-7.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Genomics Open AcceResearch article Genome-scale analysis of positional clustering of mouse testis-specific genes Quan Li†1, Bernett TK Lee†2 and Louxin Zhang*3 Address: 1Institute for Infocomm Research, Heng Mui Keng Terrace 21, Singapore, 2Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, MD 7, Medical Drive, Singapore and 3Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 2, Singapore Email: Quan Li - [email protected]; Bernett TK Lee - [email protected]; Louxin Zhang* - [email protected] * Corresponding author †Equal contributors Abstract Background: Genes are not randomly distributed on a chromosome as they were thought even after removal of tandem repeats. The positional clustering of co-expressed genes is known in prokaryotes and recently reported in several eukaryotic organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens. In order to further investigate the mode of tissue- specific gene clustering in higher eukaryotes, we have performed a genome-scale analysis of positional clustering of the mouse testis-specific genes. Results: Our computational analysis shows that a large proportion of testis-specific genes are clustered in groups of 2 to 5 genes in the mouse genome. The number of clusters is much higher than expected by chance even after removal of tandem repeats. Conclusion: Our result suggests that testis-specific genes tend to cluster on the mouse chromosomes. This provides another piece of evidence for the hypothesis that clusters of tissue- specific genes do exist. Background Positional clustering of co-expressed genes is mainly due to operons in prokaryotes. Genes located within the same operon are transcribed together and thus co-regulated. In general, operons are missing from eukaryotes. Eukaryotic genes appear to be transcribed individually and are thought to be scattered on chromosomes without appar- ent organization by function or po

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