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The influence of affective associations on the development of cognitive maps of large environments

Authors
Journal
Journal of Environmental Psychology
0272-4944
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
7
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0272-4944(87)80019-1
Disciplines
  • Ecology
  • Geography

Abstract

Abstract Anooshian and Siegel (1985) have argued that the affect associated with different environmental locations has relatively greater impact when adults initially become familiar with an environment than when they have been in that environment for an extended time period. In order to examine this hypothesis college freshmen and upperclassmen were tested. The students were asked initially to choose the four locations on their campus that they most liked and the four locations that they most disliked. They then estimated distances between each of these locations from memory. The results indicated that freshmen underestimated distances to locations associated with positive affect to a greater extent than distances to locations associated with negative affect. In contrast, the estimations of upperclassmen to locations associated with positive and negative affect were not significantly different. These results support Anooshian and Siegel's (1985) hypothesis, suggesting that affect initially influences memory for distance information but that this influence disappears with increased experience in the environment.

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