Affordable Access

Social Networks and Individual Perceptions: Explaining Differential Participation in Social Movements

Authors
Publication Date

Abstract

Social Networks and Individual Perceptions: Explaining Differential Participation in Social Movements Social Networks and Individual Perceptions: Explaining Differential Participation in Social Movements Author(s): Florence Passy and Marco Giugni Reviewed work(s): Source: Sociological Forum, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Mar., 2001), pp. 123-153 Published by: Springer Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/685032 . Accessed: 06/11/2012 14:00 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] . Springer is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Sociological Forum. http://www.jstor.org Sociological Forum, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2001 Social Networks and Individual Perceptions: Explaining Differential Participation in Social Movements1 Florence Passy2 4 and Marco Giugni3 This paper seeks to explain differential participation in social movements. It does so by attempting to bridge structural-level and individual-level explana- tions. We test a number of hypotheses drawn from the social networks and the rationalist perspectives on individual engagement by means of survey data on members of a major organization of the Swiss solidarity movement. Both per- spectives find empirical support: the intensity of participation depends both on the embeddedness in social networks and on the individual perceptions of participation, that is, the evaluation of a number of cognitive parameters related to engagement. In particular, to be recruited by an activist and the per- ceived effectiveness of one's own potential contribu

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.