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Intracisternal sauvagine is more potent than corticotropin-releasing factor to decrease gastric vagal efferent activity in rats☆

Authors
Journal
Peptides
0196-9781
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
20
Issue
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0196-9781(99)00072-8
Keywords
  • Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Antagonist
  • Intracisternal
  • Vagus
  • Parasympathetic Nervous System
  • Sauvagine
  • Gastric Vagal Efferent Activity
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Consecutive intracisternal (ic) injections of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) (21, 63, and 126 pmol, ic) or sauvagine (2.1, 6.3, and 21 pmol, ic) decreased gastric vagal efferent multiunit discharge (GVED) to 82%, 75% and 69% and 71%, 40% and 21%, respectively, from preinjection basal levels (taken as 100%). The inhibitory action was dose related (magnitude and duration of the response, 7–45 min). The CRF antagonist, [ d-Phe 12,Nle 21,38,C α-MeLeu 37]-rCRF 12–41 (6.25 nmol, ic) increased GVED by 43.5 ± 4.3% and blocked the decrease in GVED induced by CRF (21 pmol, ic) for >90 min with a complete recovery after 3 h. Vehicles (injected intracisternally) had no effect. These data indicate that: 1) CRF injected intracisternally decreases GVED through the activation of CRF receptors and sauvagine is more potent than CRF to inhibit GVED; and 2) endogenous CRF exerts an inhibitory tone on basal GVED in urethane-anesthetized rats undergoing surgery.

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