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Association of Mediterranean diet and other health behaviours with barriers to healthy eating and perceived health among British adults of retirement age

Authors
Journal
Maturitas
0378-5122
Publisher
Elsevier
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.07.003
Keywords
  • Mediterranean Diet
  • Health Behaviours
  • Barriers To Healthy Eating
  • Perceived Health
  • Online Survey
Disciplines
  • Design

Abstract

Abstract Objectives Health behaviours including diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity, predict health risks at the population level. We explored health behaviours, barriers to healthy eating and self-rated health among individuals of retirement age. Study design 82 men and 124 women participated in an observational, cross-sectional online survey. Main outcome measures A 14-item Mediterranean diet score (MDPS), perceived barriers to healthy eating (PBHE), self-reported smoking, physical activity habits, and current and prior perceived health status (PHS) were assessed. A health behaviours score (HBS) including smoking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and MDPS was created to evaluate associations with PHS. Two-step cluster analysis identified natural groups based on PBHE. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate between group comparisons. Results PBHE number was associated with BMI (r=0.28, P<0.001), age (r=−0.19; P=0.006), and MDPS (r=−0.31; P<0.001). PHBE cluster analysis produced three clusters. Cluster-1 members (busy lifestyle) were significantly younger (57 years), more overweight (28kg/m2), scored lower on MDPS (4.7) and reported more PBHE (7). Cluster-3 members (no characteristic PBHE) were leaner (25kg/m2), reported the lowest number of PBHE (2), and scored higher on HBS (2.7) and MDPS (6.2). Those in PHS categories, bad/fair, good, and very good, reported mean HBS of 2.0, 2.4 and 3.0, respectively (P<0.001). Compared with the previous year, no significant associations between PHS and HBS were observed. Conclusions PBHE clusters were associated with BMI, MDPS and PHS and could be a useful tool to tailor interventions for those of peri-retirement age.

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