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Plasticity in Major Ampullate Silk Production in Relation to Spider Phylogeny and Ecology

Authors
Journal
PLoS ONE
1932-6203
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Volume
6
Issue
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022467
Keywords
  • Research Article
  • Biology
  • Biophysics
  • Biomechanics
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology
  • Evolutionary Ecology
  • Materials Science
  • Biomaterials
Disciplines
  • Chemistry
  • Ecology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Spider major ampullate silk is a high-performance biomaterial that has received much attention. However, most studies ignore plasticity in silk properties. A better understanding of silk plasticity could clarify the relative importance of chemical composition versus processing of silk dope for silk properties. It could also provide insight into how control of silk properties relates to spider ecology and silk uses. We compared silk plasticity (defined as variation in the properties of silk spun by a spider under different conditions) between three spider clades in relation to their anatomy and silk biochemistry. We found that silk plasticity exists in RTA clade and orbicularian spiders, two clades that differ in their silk biochemistry. Orbiculariae seem less dependent on external spinning conditions. They probably use a valve in their spinning duct to control friction forces and speed during spinning. Our results suggest that plasticity results from different processing of the silk dope in the spinning duct. Orbicularian spiders seem to display better control of silk properties, perhaps in relation to their more complex spinning duct valve.

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