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Sensory acceptance and overall quality of a histidine added fish sauce

DOI: 10.1016/s0167-4501(06)80243-8
  • Biology


Abstract A 4 month incubated histidine added fish sauce wherein the hydrolysis of fish protein was accelerated during the fermentation process, was sensorially evaluated in respect to taste, smell, color and overall quality and compared with the control. Sensory evaluation results showed that the accelerated hydrolysis product fish sauce brought about by the addition of histidine was acceptable in respect to taste, smell, color and overall quality but not the control which was found to be still in the immature stage. A difference between the control and the histidine added sample was confirmed and that the concentrations of volatile acids in the control was higher than the histidine added sample. Panelists who were not familiar with the fish sauce preferred the histidine added sauce over the commercial fish sauces while those who were familiar, preferred the traditionally produced commercial sauce but accepted the histidine added sauce. Addition of histidine during fermentation did not increase the amount of histamine in the fish sauce.

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