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Poulenc's ambivalence [electronic resource]: a study in tonality, musical style, and sexuality

Authors
Publisher
The University of Texas at Austin
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Poulenc
  • Francis
  • 1899-1963 Criticism And Interpretation
Disciplines
  • Musicology

Abstract

Microsoft Word - Final Word Diss Copyright by Kevin Mark Clifton 2002 The Dissertation Committee for Kevin Mark Clifton Certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: Poulenc’s Ambivalence: A Study in Tonality, Musical Style, and Sexuality Committee: ______________________________ James Buhler, Supervisor ______________________________ Roger Graybill ______________________________ Stefan Kostka ______________________________ Andrew Dell’Antonio ______________________________ Fred Maus Poulenc’s Ambivalence: A Study in Tonality, Musical Style, and Sexuality by Kevin Mark Clifton, B.A., M.M. Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of The Univeristy of Texas at Austin in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy The University of Texas at Austin August 2002 iv Table of Contents Chapter 1: Ambivalence Theory: Definition, Context, and Methodology 1 Chapter 2: Poulenc’s Mouvements Perpétuels: A Case for Musical Cubism 25 Chapter 3: Revealing Tonal Axes and Musical Masks in Poulenc’s Concerto for Two Pianos in D minor, I 61 Chapter 4: Sexualizing the Exotic: Evocation and Meaning of the Gamelan in Poulenc’s Aubade and the Concerto for Two Pianos in D minor 108 Conclusion: Poulenc’s Ambivalence Reconsidered 149 Bibliography 155 Vita 159 1 Chapter 1 “ A work of art does not answer questions, it provokes them; and its essential meaning is in the tension between the contradictory answers.” -- Leonard Bernstein Ambivalence Theory: Definition, Context, and Methodology Introduction I would like to begin my study of the musical language of Francis Poulenc (1899-1963) by considering Ned Rorem’s description of Poulenc’s personality: Like his name he was both dapper and ungainly. His clothes came from Lanvin but were unpressed. His hands were scrubbed, but the fingernails were bitten to bone. His physiognomy showe

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