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200 junior doctors sacked in Zambia.

Authors
  • Ahmad, K
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Lancet
Publisher
Elsevier BV
Publication Date
Jul 29, 2000
Volume
356
Issue
9227
Pages
410–410
Identifiers
PMID: 10972385
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Since December 1999 junior doctors in Zambia have been on strike, demanding from the government better working conditions, better pay, and improvements in hospital services. However, on June 20, 2000, around 200 junior doctors were dismissed by the Zambian government, who asserts that the action was taken in the public¿s interest. Nevertheless, the doctors argue that the move came at a time when the country is struggling with a critical shortage of doctors and with an HIV/AIDS crisis. In addition, health policy experts say that the dismissal could further undermine the alarming conditions of Zambia's health care system. It is noted that there are only 800 doctors registered with the Zambian Medical Council, but WHO estimates that the country needs 1500 clinicians. To meet such a shortage, the government has hired Cuban and Chinese doctors. They are paid more and given more benefits than the Zambian doctors, generating complaints from the president of the junior doctors' representative body.

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