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A Preliminary Empirical Assessment of the Effect of Phytosanitary Regulations on US Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Imports

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Disciplines
  • Agricultural Science

Abstract

An Empirical Assessment of Market Access and SPS Regulations on U A Preliminary Empirical Assessment of the Effect of Phytosanitary Regulations on US Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Imports Vuko Karova Donna Roberts Jason H. Grant and Everett B. Peterson PRELIMINARY RESULTS: PLEASE DO NOT QUOTE a Karov is Graduate Research Assistant, Grant is Assistant Professor, and Peterson is Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech. Roberts is Senior Economist, Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research by the USDA/ERS Program of Research on the Economics of Invasive Species Management (PREISM). Selected Paper prepared for presentation at the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association’s 2009 AAEA & ACCI Joint Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, WI, July 26-28, 2009 Copyright 2009 by Karov, Roberts, Grant, and Peterson. All rights reserved. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies. An Empirical Assessment of Phytosanitary Regulations on US Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Imports Introduction United States (US) imports of fresh fruits and vegetables have grown substantially in recent decades and account for a steadily increasing share of domestic consumption. Since 1989, the value of US fresh vegetables imports has increased from $811.5 million to $4.28 billion in 2007, or an annual growth rate of 10.5 percent. During the same period, the value of US fresh fruit imports increased from $1.5 billion to $5.47 billion, or an annual growth rate of 7.6 percent. The rate of growth in imports of fresh vegetables has exceeded the rate of growth in total agricultural imports, with the fresh vegetable share of total US agricultural imports increasing from 3.6 percent in 1989 to 5.95 percent in

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