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Measuring and assessing the impact of basic skills on labour market outcomes

Authors
Publisher
Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Hd Industries. Land Use. Labor
  • L Education (General)
Disciplines
  • Political Science

Abstract

CEE dp 03 Total.PDF Measuring and Assessing the Impact of Basic Skills on Labour Market Outcomes Steven McIntosh and Anna Vignoles November 2000 Published by Centre for the Economics of Education London School of Economics and Political Science Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE Ó Steven McIntosh and Anna Vignoles, submitted July 2000 ISBN 0 7530 1434 3 Individual copy price: £5 The Centre for the Economics of Education is an independent research centre funded by the Department of Education and Employment. The view expressed in this work are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Education and Employment. All errors and omissions remain the authors. This work is based on the Skills Task Force Research Paper SKT 27 and the Department of Education and Employment Research Report 192 (ISBN 1 84185 261 9) published in June 2000. The original report remains Crown Copyright 2000 and was published with the permission of DfEE on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office. Executive Summary The work on the effect of basic literacy and numeracy skills on labour market outcomes arises from a recent report by Sir Claus Moser, which investigated the basic skills of English adults (DfEE, 1999). This report suggested that approximately 20% of adults in England, i.e. nearly seven million people, have severe literacy difficulties, whilst around 40% have some numeracy problems. Furthermore, the report showed that this ‘skills gap’ is one of the worst in Europe. Other recent research has confirmed this gloomy picture, indicating that as many as one in five UK adults have literacy problems1. Although this government is committed to tackling poor literacy and numeracy2, much of the emphasis thus far has been on finding ways to improve the basic skills of t

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