Affordable Access

Addressing mathematics and statistics anxiety

Authors
Publisher
The Institute of Mathematics and its Applications
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Qa Mathematics
Disciplines
  • Education
  • Mathematics

Abstract

Meena Kotecha Addressing mathematics and statistics anxiety Article (Published version) (Refereed) Original citation: Kotecha, Meena (2013) Addressing mathematics and statistics anxiety. Mathematics today , 49 (6). p. 259. ISSN 1361-2042 © 2013 Institute of Mathematics and its Applications This version available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/54839/ Available in LSE Research Online: December 2013 LSE has developed LSE Research Online so that users may access research output of the School. Copyright © and Moral Rights for the papers on this site are retained by the individual authors and/or other copyright owners. Users may download and/or print one copy of any article(s) in LSE Research Online to facilitate their private study or for non-commercial research. You may not engage in further distribution of the material or use it for any profit-making activities or any commercial gain. You may freely distribute the URL (http://eprints.lse.ac.uk) of the LSE Research Online website. Mathematics TODAY DECEMBER 2013 259 Addressing Mathematics and Statistics Anxiety Anxiety related to mathematics and sta-tistics is a complex issue which requires extremely delicate handling. It is usu- ally accompanied by test anxiety because of the negative emotions learners associate with these subjects. These emotions could either be triggered by prior unpleasant learning experi- ences or preconceived negative notions formed outside school. The fact still remains that this anxiety continues to challenge educators across the globe. I would argue that this is also a challenge in higher education and can dampen undergraduate students’ enthusiasm to engage with mathematics and statistics courses. This can have an adverse impact on students’ academic performance as well as their future careers, if it is not addressed. Further, the increasing diversity in the British university student population as a result of the high proportion of intern

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.