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Book Review: The Emergent Knowledge Society and the Future of Higher Education: Asian Perspectives

Authors
Publisher
University Library System, University of Pittsburgh
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Disciplines
  • Education

Abstract

KATA PENGANTAR Excellence in Higher Education 3 (2012): 66-67 Book Review: The Emergent Knowledge Society and the Future of Higher Education: Asian Perspectives Edited by Deane E. Neubauer. New York: Routledge, 2012. 240 pp. ISBN: 978-0-415-60869-5. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. ISSN 2153-9669 (print) 2153-9677 (online) | doi: 10.5195/ehe.2012.69 | http://ehe.pitt.edu We all experience the remarkable speed at which society is changing. We are living in exponential times. Information and its effects are at the core of major transformations. Globalization and technology help us access what a generation ago we would not even have dreamt of. What are the impacts of these substantial changes and resulting paradigm shifts? How do they affect higher education? Throughout The Emergent Knowledge Society and the Future of Higher Education: Asian Perspectives, Deane E. Neubauer and a diverse group of contributors attempt to map how this almost chaotic and increasing flux of information is influencing higher education in Asia. It is assumed as a central thesis that society and all its institutions are transformed and reshaped by an unstoppable cycle of information referred to as the “global knowledge society.” Using different case studies and broad analyses, the book does not follow a clear section pattern, but rather an interesting mix of national and transnational descriptions of trends. Chapter 1, therefore, orients the reader to the major problems universities in East Asia face in their quest to handle and produce knowledge in a competitive market. Universities are trying to catch up with what is considered an unavoidable agenda—becoming a top research university with a distinct identity. This is especially relevant when the increasing competition for funds and preeminence is blurring differences between academia an

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