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Hypoglycémie spontanée et insuffisance rénale chronique.

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PMC
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  • Research Article

Abstract

Although glucose intolerance occurs as a consequence of chronic renal failure, improvement of a diabetic state by deterioration of renal function is a well known phenomenon. Recently occasional cases of spontaneous hypoglycemia in patients with chronic renal failure have been reported; two such cases and the results of metabolic studies are described in this paper. Pituitary, thyroid and adrenal function appeared to be normal. The results of an oral glucose tolerance test were normal; an appropriate insulin response was demonstrated in one patient, and a slightly elevated basal insulin value with a delayed insulin response to oral administration of glucose was demonstrated in the other. An insulin tolerance test did not support the hypothesis of increased insulin sensitivity as a factor, and the growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was normal. An intravenous glucagon test caused a subnormal increase in plasma glucose concentration, and the intravenous administration of tolbutamide produced hypoglycemia without an increase insulin sensitivity as a factor, and the growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was normal. An intravenous glucagon test caused a subnormal increase in plasma glucose concnetration, and the intravenous administration of tolbutamide produced hypoglycemia without an increase in insulin values. The plasma alanine concentration was low and the proinsulin/insulin ratio was increased. The origin of this hypoglycemia is not clear but is probably multifactorial. However, low hepatic glycogen stores and inadequate gluconeogenesis due to substrate deficiency seem to be involved.

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