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THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL STATUS ON PSYCHIATRIC DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY - AN INFLAMMATORY MODEL

Authors
Publisher
Medicinska naklada; [email protected]
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Disciplines
  • Medicine
  • Psychology

Abstract

Microsoft Word - dnb-24_2-32.doc 226 Psychiatria Danubina, 2012; Vol. 24, No. 2, pp 226-228 Letter to the Editor © Medicinska naklada - Zagreb, Croatia THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL STATUS ON PSYCHIATRIC DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY - AN INFLAMMATORY MODEL Adam M.H. Young1, Garth M. Funston1 & Mark Agius2,3 1School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK 3South Essex Partnership University Foundation Trust, UK * * * * * INTRODUCTION Chronic inflammation of the brain during the prenatal period, infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood has a significant impact on brain structures involved in cognition and mental health (Lupien 2009). Specific effects on the brain, behaviour and cognition are related to the timing and duration of exposure to inflammation, and in some instances, interactions between gene affects and past exposure to environ- mental adversity (Lupien 2009). There is a growing focus on neuroinflammation playing a significant role in psychiatry; schizophrenia (Shen et al. 2008), bipolar disorder (Hope et al. 2009), autism (Vargas et al. 2005) and psychosis (Masopust et al. 2011). Here we highlight the effects of social status which is described here as a pathogenic factor, on suscep- tibility to inflammatory disease and discuss how this relationship holds potential implications for the field of psychiatry. ACKNOWLEDGING SOCIAL STATUS The origin of ‘racial’, ‘class’ and ‘ethnic’ disparities in health has recently become the centre of some debate, with proposals for addressing disparity focused on individual-orientated prevention by alterations to lifestyle (Link & Phelan 2000). Poor diet, sedentary lifestyle, smoking and excessive alcohol intake are widely regarded as key predisposing factors and thus potential targets for change (Wallace & Wallace 2010). A second theory currently gaining increasing support is tha

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