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An investigation into creating vibrant social spaces through games and activities in the new Student Union Building

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Disciplines
  • Design
  • Ecology
  • Economics
  • Geography
  • Social Sciences

Abstract

The University of British Columbia feels that there is a need for student interaction on campus, the absence of which can lead to deteriorating mental and emotional health. To combat this, the Alma Mater Society (AMS) have designated a vibrant social space to be constructed in the new Student Union Building. The objective of this report is to give recommendations on how to create this vibrant social space. Using examples of vibrant social spaces implemented in other universities, we determined that this social space needs to be dynamic so it can serve multiple purposes, while mainly serving as a game room. Research demonstrated that a DLP projector is the most suitable for a multimedia projector, which will mainly be used for watching sports but can also be used to convert the social space into a lecture hall or a movie theatre. Our analysis of lighting demonstrated that LED lighting is much superior to its alternatives in all three aspects of the triple bottom line assessment, and certain colours can also be used as “mood lighting”. All of this ties into our main objective, which we have achieved by recommending a variety of games for students that encourage interaction and can also be a good source of stress relief. The use of the triple bottom line assessment has allowed us to create a social space which is socially, economically, and environmentally feasible. The recommendations made in this report ensure that the social space will be a dynamic environment where students can feel welcome and where new relationships can be fostered. Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report.”

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