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SAFETY OF KETOROLAC IN THE PEDIATRIC POPULATION AFTER URETERONEOCYSTOSTOMY

Authors
Journal
The Journal of Urology
0022-5347
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
166
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0022-5347(05)65710-2
Keywords
  • Ureter
  • Ketorolac
  • Safety
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Purpose Ketorolac has been used to provide effective postoperative analgesia in children and decreases hospitalization for pediatric patients undergoing ureteroneocystostomy. However, it can cause severe side effects, including increased bleeding and renal insufficiency, which can be devastating in a child. Little has been reported on the safety of ketorolac by evaluating creatinine, hematocrit and complications. Materials and Methods An institutional retrospective review was performed during an 18-month period in which 118 patients underwent ureteroneocystostomy. One group containing 50 patients received caudal anesthetic preoperatively and narcotic analgesics postoperatively, while another 68 received caudal anesthetic preoperatively and ketorolac postoperatively. Patient ages, type of procedure, preoperative and postoperative creatinine and hematocrit, and complications were noted in each cohort. Results Average patient age of the control analgesic and ketorolac groups was 5.3 years (range 1 to 17) and 5.5 (1 to 12), respectively. There was no statistical difference between postoperative creatinine (0.68 and 0.65 mg./dl.) and hematocrit (33% and 34%) between the groups. One patient in each group had increased creatinine postoperatively. Minor complications, for example ileus and bladder spasms, were equivalent in both groups. No patient receiving ketorolac had any allergic or hypersensitivity reaction to the medication, and no major complications were reported. Conclusions Ketorolac given after ureteroneocystostomy did not cause a significant decrease in hematocrit, increase in creatinine or overall complications. Because of the safety of ketorolac in our series, and ability to decrease hospital stay and narcotic requirements in children as reported previously, it is used as standard postoperative protocol after ureteroneocystostomy at our institution.

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