Do women control what they grow? The gendered use of kickStart’s pumps for irrigation in Kenya and Tanzania

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Do women control what they grow? The gendered use of kickStart’s pumps for irrigation in Kenya and Tanzania

Authors
Publisher
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI);
Keywords
  • Irrigation
  • Africa
  • Gender
  • Women
  • Productivity
  • Kenya
  • Tanzania
  • East Africa
  • Agricultural Development
  • Africa South Of Sahara

Abstract

Do Women Control What They Grow? The Gendered Use of KickStart’s Pumps for Irrigation in Kenya and Tanzania GAAP NOTE | NOVEMBER 2013 Led by IFPRI & GAAP Gender, Agriculture, & Assets Project Gender, Agriculture, and Assets: Learning from Eight Agricultural Development Interventions in Africa and South Asia Do Women Control What They Grow? The Gendered Use of KickStart’s Pumps for Irrigation in Kenya and Tanzania Jemimah Njuki, Elizabeth Waithanji, Beatrice Sakwa, Juliet Kariuki, Elizabeth Mukewa, and John Ngige THE KICKSTART INTERNATIONAL PROJECT’S OBJECTIVE IS TO INCREASE CROP PRODUCTION AND productivity through the use of human-powered, low-cost micro-irrigation pumps. Direct benefits of the proj- ect include increased incomes and improved food security for households using pumps. The Gender, Agriculture, and Assets Project collaborated with KickStart to better understand the gender dynamics of who purchases and controls pumps, as well as the intrahousehold effects of pump use on decisionmaking and use of income from irrigated crops. The majority of Kenyan and Tanzanian households depend on rain-fed agriculture, even in arid and semi-arid regions where weather is variable and precipitation is inconsistent (Rockström et al. 2007). In such agricultural systems, irrigation can have a significant positive impact: farmers can make use of more land, plant more crops per annum, and reap higher yields while reducing their vulnerability to climate variability. Many smallholder farmers have adopted new technologies such as motorized pumps and human-powered pumps to acquire water otherwise unavailable to them and use that water more effectively in their fields. Today, organizations such as KickStart International are using market-based approaches to disseminate some of these technologies (treadle pumps and hand-operated pumps, specifically) to smallholder farmers. This study by the Gender, Agriculture, and Assets Project (GAAP) examines KickStart pump ownershi

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