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Short term synaptic depression with stochastic vesicle dynamics imposes a high-pass filter on presynaptic information

Authors
Journal
BMC Neuroscience
1471-2202
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
13
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2202-13-s1-o17
Keywords
  • Oral Presentation
Disciplines
  • Mathematics

Abstract

Short term synaptic depression with stochastic vesicle dynamics imposes a high-pass filter on presynaptic information ORAL PRESENTATION Open Access Short term synaptic depression with stochastic vesicle dynamics imposes a high-pass filter on presynaptic information Robert Rosenbaum1,2*, Jonathan Rubin1,2, Brent Doiron1,2 From Twenty First Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2012 Decatur, GA, USA. 21-26 July 2012 The filtering properties of synapses are modulated by a form of short term depression arising from the depletion of neurotransmitter vesicles. The uptake and release of these vesicles is stochastic in nature, but a widely used model of synaptic depression does not take this stochas- ticity into account. While this model of synaptic depres- sion accurately captures the trial-averaged synaptic response to a presynaptic spike train [1], it fails to cap- ture variability introduced by stochastic vesicle dynamics [2]. Our goal is to understand the impact of stochastic vesicle dynamics on filtering and information transfer in depressing synapses. We derive compact, closed-form expressions for the synaptic filter induced by short term synaptic depression * Correspondence: [email protected] 1Mathematics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA Full list of author information is available at the end of the article Figure 1 The linear information rate, IL(g;s), which represents the information per unit time available to an optimal linear decoder that estimates a rate-coded presynaptic signal, s(t), by observing a postsynaptic conductance, g(t). The linear information rate is plotted as a function of the peak frequency, fs, of the signal. When stochastic vesicle dynamics are ignored (dashed red line), IL(g;s) is independent of fs[3,4]. When stochastic vesicle dynamics are accounted for (solid blue line), information transfer is reduced and high-frequency signals are transferred more reliably than low-frequency signals. Rosenbaum et al. BMC Neuroscienc

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