X-Y DNA, OA, PeerJ, HIV & KKD: The Alphabet of Our Picks of the Week

[7 – 11 July 2014] The editors’ note about your science week

X-Y DNA, OA, PeerJ, HIV & KKD: The Alphabet of Our Picks of the Week

This week in the research world, good news from PeerJ on its open access publishing model, alongside questions about hype surrounding scientific feats and disgust over mass layoffs of academics in London. The debate(s) go on!

This week in the research world, good news from PeerJ on its open access publishing model, alongside questions about hype surrounding scientific feats and disgust over mass layoffs of academics in London. The debate(s) go on!

 

On the MyScienceWork Menu:

Remember that business about X and Y joining A, C, T, and G? The first artificial bases ever inserted into DNA’s genetic alphabet? While the science behind it was indeed remarkable, biologist James Bowers asks if the media may have overhyped the potential applications.

Hold your genetically-modified-“XY” horses

 

There was excitement over at open access publisher PeerJ, too, this week:

One size does not fit all. Exciting times for Open Access as PeerJ announces second round of funding

 

Though here in Paris we’re having trouble believing it, summer is in full swing! If you’re lucky enough to be on a beach somewhere, take a look at the sand dunes around you. Are they creeping up on you? Could be: In Episode 4 of KKD, Mathieu explains his research on the way Barchan dune fields move.

Knock Knock Doc - Episode 04 # Season 1 Barchan Dune Fields

(Credit: Grisha Levit / Flickr)

 

Some favorites from around the web:

This week in a blog post on The Guardian, Jenny Rohan, a cell biologist (among other things), shared her view on the layoffs of a “crippling number of academics” at Univeristy College London and the attitude this shows toward scientific human capital.

The King's College London scientist purge: what message does it send?

 

Dr. Rohan argues the decision was illogical. Quantum math may have something to say about irrational human behavior. Discover quantum cognition:

Quantum math makes human irrationality more sensible

 

Regarding chimpanzee behavior, instead, researchers from the University of St Andrews have catalogued the meaning of their body language:

The 66 gestures which show how chimpanzees communicate      

 

Following up on a story that received great attention for the hope it offered in the fight against HIV:

HIV Returns in 'Cured' Mississippi Baby

 

Finally, something to do at sunset, if you happen to be in New York City today or tomorrow, is to take in “Manhattanhenge”, when the setting sun will line up with the Big Apple’s east-west streets. Somewhat less intriguing than Stonehenge, the images stil promise to be striking.

How To See 'Manhattanhenge' On July 11 And 12 (MAP)