Science Pops Open, Ep.2: Improving outcomes of crisis and conflict, thanks to an ethnographic outlook

Research fellows of the AXA Research Fund tell the story of their work to reduce an array of risks

Affected by forces like poverty, political unrest, and food insecurity, Mali is just one example of a country where crisis and conflict have led to a variety of risks coexisting, with different consequences for all of the actors involved. In this video, Dr. Ruben Andersson explains the kinds of concrete risks he has observed in his work in Mali and across the wider Sahel region, and how, as an ethnographer, he aims to contribute to greater success for international interventions in the world’s most insecure zones. 

Cet article existe également en français :
Science Pops Open, Ep. 2 : Un regard d'ethnographe pour améliorer la gestion des situations de crises et de conflits

 

Affected by forces like poverty, political unrest, and food insecurity, Mali is just one example of a country where crisis and conflict have led to a variety of risks coexisting, with different consequences for all of the actors involved. Assessing, prioritizing and facing all these challenges is fundamental to the success of humanitarian and peacekeeping missions in some of the places that need it most.

Ruben Andersson was in London when conflict broke out in Mali. The Swedish researcher had spent time in the West African nation for his PhD research and he watched from afar as the country’s stability fell apart. Seeing even vital humanitarian actions scaled back, for security reasons, he knew he had to return, armed with his knowledge of Mali and his anthropologist’s point of view.

In this video, Dr. Andersson explains the kinds of concrete risks he has observed in his work in Mali and across the wider Sahel region, and how, as an ethnographer, he aims to contribute to greater success for international interventions in the world’s most insecure zones. 

 

 

Next Monday:

In an earthquake, keeping your buildings standing is a good start, but it’s not nearly enough. Engineer Anna Reggio explains how the way we build can have a huge impact on a community’s ability to bounce back after such a natural disaster. 

More Episodes of Science Pops Open: 

Ep. 1 - "Your body can defend itself against cancer. It just needs a little help!", with Margot Cucchetti

Ep. 2 – Improving outcomes of crisis and conflict, thanks to an ethnographic outlook, with Ruben Andersson

Ep. 3 – After an Earthquake, the Show Must Go On, with Anna Reggio

Ep. 4 – Disrupting the Sleeping Sickness Symphony, with Fabien Guegan

Ep. 5 – Optimizing Welfare…and Equality, with Sean Slack

Ep. 6 – Awaiting Balance in the Adolescent Brain, with Kiki Zanolie

Ep. 7 – Come Drought or High Water, with Luciano Raso

Ep. 8 – Taking European Tornadoes by Storm, with Bogdan Antonescu

Ep. 9 – Learning to Tackle Climate Change Together, with Sandrine Sidze

Ep. 10 – Nourish the Children of Urban Slums, with Sophie Goudet

Ep. 11 – In Money Matters, We're Only Human, with Jeroen Nieboer

Ep. 12 – A Depressed Sense of Smell?, with Kalliopi Apazoglou

Ep. 13 – Climate Shifts Carried on a River of Air, with Nikolaos Bakas

Ep. 14 – Something in the Air Down There, with Fulvio Amato

Ep. 15 – Foretelling a Complex Future for our Complex Ecosystems, with Phillip Staniczenko

Ep. 16 – From Childhood Illness to Innovative Antibiotics, with Agata Starosta

Ep. 17 – Plants & Poisons: Assessing Contamination in Our Environment, with Natalia Ospina-Alvarez

Ep. 18 – Voice of a Storm Surge, with Emiliano Renzi