Of man augmented, porpoises and insects

[June 3-7, 2013] The editor's note about your science week

Change is inevitable and it's everywhere: in the future of society, in animal behavior, and even in our diets. This week's articles on MyScienceNews will show you how.

Change is inevitable and it's everywhere: in the future of society, in animal behavior, and even in our diets. This week's articles on MyScienceNews will show you how.

This week, the second article of our trilogy about the technological singularity came out! This time, Rodhlann Jornod, a PhD candidate in practical philosophy, explains that society has to properly prepare to experience the technological singularity. Approaching complex notions such as foresight and futurology, he deflates the stereotypes and fantasies related to what might be a highly technological future.

Nebulous understanding of the technological singularity

 

As humans and society evolve, so do animals. A new study shows that killer whales affect the evolution of behavior in porpoises and other marine mammals more than was ever believed. Porpoises use echolocation to hunt, and the clicks they produce to find prey are very unusual, never going below 100kHz. It seems this may have evolved as a strategy to avoid becoming a killer whale’s next meal…

Killer Whales & Porpoise Clicks

 

Humans need to eat, too, of course and feeding the planet will become increasingly difficult as the population continues to grow. This week, MyScienceNews puts on the table the idea of entomophagy, that is, consuming insects. In our brand new slideshow format, learn about their nutritional value and even how to prepare them!

Entomophagy: Innovation in your diet!

 

Bon appétit, and enjoy your weekend.

The MyScienceWork Team