MSW’s open catalogue, #Scio14, and other picks of the week

[24 - 28 February 2014] The editors’ note about your science week

The news has traveled in the Open Access community: MyScienceWork has opened full access to its catalogue without registration! This and other news on skin-turned-liver cells, peering inside flattened fossils, and the side effects of anti-depressants, in our picks of the week.

This week, on the MyScienceWork menu:

The news has traveled in the Open Access community: MyScienceWork has opened full access to its catalogue without registration!

MyScienceWork opens access to full catalogue of scientific articles

In paleontology news, this week we talked about a new method for visualizing the internal anatomy of even very flat fossils. A wealth of information is now accessible beneath a layer of stone. Making it all possible: rare earth elements.

Rare Earth Elements Provide a Better Look at Fossils

 

Some favorites from around the web:

The great, annual gathering in Raleigh, North Carolina of any and all interested in the way science is communicated, ScienceOnline 2014, is now underway. Check their site for livestreams of certain events, or follow on Twitter with the hashtag #scio14.

And for some of that online science communicating they’ll be talking about all weekend in Raleigh, here are a few of our favorite headlines of the week:

- Researchers in regenerative medicine have taken an important step by successfully generating mature, fully functional cells that could replace damaged ones.

Scientists transform skin cells into functioning liver cells

- A French computer scientist discovered that more than 120 articles published in conference proceedings over the last five years were actually generated by a computer.

Publishers withdraw more than 120 gibberish papers

- Over-prescription of anti-depressant drugs is a concern worrying the medical community. A new study finds there may be good reason for the questions raised.

Psychological side-effects of anti-depressants worse than thought

- A remarkable image taken from space shows what North Korea’s mandatory power cuts at night look like:

An Astronaut's View of the North Korean Electricity Black Hole

 
(Image: NASA)