Farewell, KKD! Hello, metamaterials, democracy, Syrian tensions in Iraq

[25-29 November 2013] The editors' note about your science week

This week MyScienceWork is in mourning, as the very last episode of Knock Knock Doc has aired! But we take comfort in some other news – about coding classes for women, about open access and democracy and strange new materials with properties never seen before. Read on to learn more…

This week MyScienceWork is in mourning, as the very last episode of Knock Knock Doc has aired! But we take comfort in some other news – about coding classes for women, about open access and democracy and strange new materials with properties never seen before. Read on to learn more…

This week MyScienceWork is in mourning, as the very last episode of Knock Knock Doc has aired. We’ve been through a lot with Arthur over these two seasons and it’s hard to see him go. Find out the fate of our young friend’s project and, while you’re at it, learn about research into metamaterials with unnatural acoustic properties, in this, the final episode of Knock Knock Doc:

Knock Knock Doc - Episode 10 # Season 2: Utopic Waves

In this time of sorrow, we do find consolation in the fact that tomorrow, 30 November, a great coding class, specifically for women, is taking place in Luxembourg – and the instructor is our own Fräntz Miccoli! Find out about this initiative that aims to see more women actively involved in IT:

Women want to code! Don’t you?                                       

For Hervé Le Crosnier, the informed involvement of citizens is essential to democracy; in societies like ours, where science and technology are omnipresent, that means these subjects cannot be reserved for specialists. In this video interview from Open Access Week 2013 in Paris, he explains how open access can help provide life-long learning for every citizen, thereby ensuring the strength of our democracy.

[VIDEO] [Open Access Interviews] Hervé Le Crosnier

Elsewhere in the world, populations are struggling to establish or maintain a democratic society. The question is not always as simple as pro-democracy parties versus authoritarian parties. For example, as Clio Bayle explains in this article, Baghdad may appear to support Syria’s president against popular uprisings in his country, but the reasons behind this stance have more to do with centuries-old sectarian conflict within Iraq itself.

Iraq/Syria: What’s behind Baghdad’s support of Bashar al-Assad

Another multidisciplinary week on MyScienceWork.
Enjoy catching up on some reading this weekend, and we’ll see you Monday for more.

The MyScienceWork Team

 

Kkd