Don’t like the system? Change it.

[September 23-27, 2013] The editors’ note about your science week

This week MyScienceWork’s articles may have covered very different topics, but they all contained a common message: if something’s not working for you, fix it! That goes for genome sequencing, politics and, of course, scientific publishing.

This week MyScienceWork’s articles may have covered very different topics, but they all contained a common message: if something’s not working for you, fix it! That goes for genome sequencing, politics and, of course, scientific publishing.

 

While the newly sequenced genome of organisms of all different shapes, sizes and phyla are announced nearly every time you turn around, something you don’t hear much about is the reliability of the software used to do it. Using the same data, one doesn’t necessarily give the same DNA sequence as the next. Adrian Giordani (@speakster) asks “Could the crackers of genomes be doing it all wrong?” and explains some changes to the system that could help improve their performance, in:

Genome researchers find software used to piece together genetic codes are not reliable

 

Knock Knock Doc returned this week to introduce us to the interesting PhD work of Jérémie Moualek (@jeremiemoualek). For his thesis, he is making a film on the phenomenon of protest voting. Some people make their vote for political change heard, not by choosing a candidate, but by choosing neither. Find out about Jérémie and his work in:

Knock Knock Doc - Episode 01 # Season 2 : Neither one!

Anyone who knows MyScienceWork knows we see the promise in changing today’s system of scientific publication. That’s why, once again, we’re taking on the organization of Open Access Week, in the company of a number of new partners. We’ve just sent out a call for contributions. If you’d like to organize an event for #OAW13, or set up a livestream of the Parisian presentations, get in touch:

MyScienceWork: Coordinator of Open Access Week 2013 events in France

 

In the meantime, maybe you’d like to see some change at your own organization, build an institutional archive where all your fellow researchers could submit their publications. In this video, Odile Hologne (@Holo_08), managing director of scientific information at France’s INRA, explains in concrete terms the things to think about to create a successful archive, useful both to researchers and their institutions.

[Open Access Interviews] Odile Hologne

 

And, with that, we wish you a very good weekend. See you next week for more Knock Knock Doc (you'll hardly recognize Arthur!!), the chance to ponder the nature of immortality, and lots more.

The MyScienceWork Team