An Open Science Summer on MyScienceWork

Open data politics & promise, advances in open access, the Wikipedia model for research – catch up on all the open science on #MSWnews

Summertime is always a good time to disconnect a little, but then comes the anxiety: What did I miss?? As far as MyScienceWork open science subjects are concerned, we can help with that. Here is a quick rundown on some interesting topics you may have missed this summer, from open access in Africa, to a debate around open government data – Real transparency or political illusion? – to the increasingly close connections between science, Wikipedia and even democracy.

Summertime is always a good time to disconnect a little, but then comes the anxiety: What did I miss?? As far as MyScienceWork open science subjects are concerned, we can help with that. Here is a quick rundown on some interesting topics you may have missed this summer, from open access in Africa, to a debate around open government data – Real transparency or political illusion? – to the increasingly close connections between science, Wikipedia and even democracy.

Where to begin with a summer retrospective? If not with the summer equinox, then why not with the launch of MyScienceWork’s Premium  offer in June? Helping to move science 2.0 forward, we now offer access to paid publications right on the platformin addition to the 31 million open access publications already available—as well as a new range of social features and tools.  

What Happens When MyScienceWork Goes Premium?

 

Numerous other tools are emerging online to make the way we do science more efficient and more open. Thomas Crouzier surveyed the options out there, which we summarized for you here:

Researchers in the cloud by Thomas Crouzier

 

In terms of scientific publishing evolving, at last, open access publisher Peer J had good news this summer:

One size does not fit all. Exciting times for Open Access as PeerJ announces second round of funding

 

In Africa, too, things are changing. Iryna Kuchma presented the great success of a project to inform the researchers of 100 African institutions on current changes in scholarly communication, along with the launch of new OA repositories: the count is at 25 and growing.

Open access in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania — making research more relevant to the world

 

As scientific communication moves towards open access, what’s happening to the role of the publisher? Agnès Henri, an editorial director at EDP Sciences, tells us in this video:

[Open Access Interviews] Agnès Henri - EDP Sciences: The Role of the Scientific Publisher Today

 

Agnès Henri gives us the point of view of a publisher; what do researchers think of open access? Lu Xiao summarized the results of her study on perceptions of OA and Wikipedia in the scientific community. She finds that:

Academic opinions of Wikipedia and open access will improve with more active involvement

 

What’s the connection between science and Wikipedia, anyway? There are some interesting similarities, but also some points where research would do well to learn from Wiki, as their paths continue to cross.

When Science and Wikipedia Rub Elbows

 

Wikipedia has always been good at sharing and leveling the knowledge playing field. Learn more about that side of its history and development, and hear from two Wikipedians on their experience of contributing to the site, in two parts:

Wikipedia, Sharing Democratically

Democratizing Expertise, Thanks to Wikipedia

 

Sharing knowledge promises not only to promote democratic ideals, but, very concretely, to accelerate innovation. We asked the question:

Open Data: To Improve Innovation, Do We Need to Share?

 

The release of government data to the public is also heralded as a great step toward transparency. But is it possible that we give this data too much credit? We interviewed data sociologist Evelyn Ruppert to find out.

Open Data: A Political Illusion?

 

And, one last bit of food for thought: Why is data such a big deal? Consider this infographic and the fact that…

90% of world's data generated in last two years

 

We hope you’ve found some stories of interest here. Going forward, we’ll be focusing more and more on the developments in, around, underlying and in favor of open science. Stay tuned!