A Selection of Science: Our Picks of the Week

[17 - 21 February 2014] The editors’ note about your science week

This week, we decided to stop hoarding and to share some of the most interesting pieces of news and reflections on research that crossed our path this week. So, in addition to our own publications, check out a new discovery in geometry, of all fields, thoughts on learning longer, and some adorable, animated quantum entanglement.

This week, we decided to stop hoarding and to share some of the most interesting pieces of news and reflections on research that crossed our path this week. So, in addition to our own publications, check out a new discovery in geometry, of all fields, thoughts on learning longer, and some adorable, animated quantum entanglement.

Screen shot from Quantum Entanglement Animated (PhD Comics)

This week, on the MyScienceWork menu:

- The results of recent studies have created concern that large-scale wind farms could alter the local climate. New research says the effect will be small on the level of Europe as a whole.

Wind Turbines Have Very Little Impact on Climate  

 

- An important part of making science more open is the ability to share data, but the massive amounts produced make this cumbersome, at best. Never fear: peer-to-peer to the rescue!

Academic Torrents: Bringing P2P Technology to the Academic World

 

- The February #CNEStweetup took place this week, featuring space and the military. Satellites are now synonymous with military superiority.

Satellites in the Service of Defense

 

Some favorites from around the web:

 

- Research on the retina of the eye has led to the discovery of a whole new category of geometric forms, which may, in turn, have applications in fighting viruses!

After 400 years, mathematicians find a new class of shapes

 

- New formats and channels for education are emerging these days, made possible by the web and mobile technology. John Maeda, President of the Rhode Island School of Design, has another tempting idea: he writes that “we are living decades longer than we did when a four-year college education -- a gorging on knowledge in your 20s -- was established as a model. In this day and age, I believe we need less higher-ed, and more longer-ed…”

Why Higher Ed is Slow to Become Longer Ed

 

- PhD Comics makes quantum physics accessible, and even cute, in this third video in their animated series:

Quantum Entanglement Animated

 

- It was only a matter of time before all the smileys infiltrated our brain, as well as our emails and texts. ;)

The Human Brain Now Reacts to Emoticons Like Real Faces

 

- Writing about efforts to improve gender balance at universities and in research, Curt Rice says he has “become convinced that changes in these areas must be supported and perhaps even initiated at the top if they are to have any hope of success.” Do you agree?

A fresh policy on gender balance and gendered research

 

Have a great weekend!

The MyScienceWork Team